Monthly Archives: August 2013

Floodverb for Reaktor

Boscomac has released Floodverb for Reaktor, a lovely sounding reverb with a control that lets you shift it from static into infinite reverberation on the fly, plus a ducking mode that brings up the reverb when you stop playing.

FLOODVERB is a special reverb that inundates your sound and plunges it into the depths of the spread. Conventionally, you can choose the level of reverb, the rate of diffusion of the reverb sound and even the color of its spread by using the band-stop filters.

But the original aspect of Floodverb lies in its three modes of actions:

  • Fixed: you set the length of the reverb.
  • Controlled: you choose by a midi controller that the reverb becomes inifinite.
  • Ducked: when you do not play, the reverb becomes infinite and suspends your last notes.

Three interesting ways that make Floodverb is a unique effect. Let yourself go snorkeling in the background of sound ocean and maybe after a few hours of music, you will see some dolphins …

Get it here. As usual, it’s free, but users who appreciate Boscomac’s wonderful ensembles are encouraged to leave a donation.

Konkreet Performer update!

A new version of Konkreet Performer appeared over the weekend with a couple of great improvements. Number one, there’s now a way to resize the touch areas – a larger touch area around each node makes aiming easier, which is great especially in the frenzied spurts of creativity this control surface inspires.

Secondly, there’s now a setting to make the angle parameter “discontinuous”. Previously, the angle of a node from the center increased from left to right whether the node was above or below the center node. That way, the value would never jump from one to zero but always smoothly increase to one and back to zero as you orbited the node around the center.

That’s great in one way, if you don’t want that jump, but it doesn’t allow the angle from centre parameter to distinguish between values above and values below the centre node. With discontinuity activated, every angle in the 360 degree circle is unique; the values above range from zero to 0.5 and the values below, as you continue clockwise, go from 0.5 to 1 and right at the end they jump from 1 back to zero.

This is going to be terrific for my Chroma and Mirage instruments, which send their values back to Konkreet Performer on snap change, to place the Performer nodes according to the settings of the current snapshot; now, I can guarantee that the placement on snap change will be the same every time.

Discontinuity will also allow for much higher resolution control of the angle parameter, as you wind around it to change a value in your Reaktor ensembles or other destinations. I’ll post some examples for you later this week.

(incidentally, there will be free updates of Chroma and Mirage this fall!)

Update: looks like there’s a bug with node angle when Konkreet receives OSC. This won’t be a problem for most users, who are only sending from Konkreet to their musical devices and not receiving values in Konkreet to update the node positions. The Konkreet devs are aware of the problem and a fix is coming.

@peterdines Your article just triggered the dawning realisation that we forgot to test OSC In with node angle discontinuous! Damn!
ā€” KonkreetLabs (@konkreetlabs) August 12, 2013

@peterdines guess there’ll be a v2.1.1 fix for OSC In soon… šŸ˜‰ #KnewIForgotSomething
ā€” KonkreetLabs (@konkreetlabs) August 12, 2013

UPDATE: and now, the update is updated with a fix for OSC receive in discontinuous angle mode! I was testing this and experimenting with it last night. The cool thing is, now you can calculate polar to rectangular coordinates using discontinuous mode, because every node position is unique – which not only makes it better for recalling node position from Reaktor snaps, but for visualizing node position on the screen. I’m in the process of updating the Konkreet translator / visualizer accordingly.

REAKTORā€™s Scenario and ā€œOperation Limitationā€

In this video, Brent Kallmer discusses the benefits of limiting your options by using the classic Reaktor ensemble Scenario. I can relate to this, as can anyone with a well stocked plugin folder, especially us Reaktor users – it’s easy to get trapped in what the writer Douglas Coupland called options paralysis.

Brent offers some further thoughts on his blog at Bluewater VST.

Euclidean Sequencing in Reaktor

Here is a ridiculously cool Euclidean sequencer for Reaktor. It features 16 individual channels each with their own settings and an adjustable lowest note for MIDI output.

The sequencer makes no sound itself but you can direct its MIDI output to anything. Here’s a video showing the sequencer in use triggering Microtonic:

Sequencer download and more information here. I stumbled across the author’s site while searching for some tips on how to use the Reaktor event bus, one of the components of the partials framework, about which the author – the mysterious “marv” – has written an article here.

For more on Euclidean rhythms and sequencing in general, check out this superb and inspiring article on the topic at Create Digital Music.

Update: Marv / Normalised has kindly posted an updated version of the sequencer below in the comments. There’s just one sequencer in the newer instrument but it should be a breeze to copy and paste it.

Ableton Live + Reaktor MIDI OSC workaround

In this video, John Burgess demonstrates how to route MIDI over OSC between different instances of Reaktor in Ableton Live, in order to send on multiple channels to Kontakt.


I’m not the biggest Ableton Live fiend on the planet, so if there’s a different workaround, let me know in the comments and I’ll add it here. Nevertheless, John has created a very cool introduction to Reaktor’s ability to send MIDI over OSC, something I haven’t experimented with much. Besides its applicability in Live, this technique could also come in very handy to route MIDI over the network in Windows, or between Windows and a Mac – or between two Macs if for some reason you don’t want to use the built in network MIDI facilities.

John also created another video on Reaktor in Live, demonstrating how to keep Live from putting Reaktor to sleep when you’re using it to transmit MIDI. Handy to know in conjunction with the other video!