Yearly Archives: 2013

Boscomac releases Delight Delay


Boscomac has released Delight Delay, a graphically sequenced delay effect for Reaktor:

DELIGHT DELAY is a pattern-based delay controlled by a sequencer. A central display allows you to set the level and filtering rehearsals and so draw a pattern. You can set the number of repetitions (1 to 15) determine the tempo (1/4 to 1/32), adjust the stereo (mono or pingpong) and adjust the blend.

Very easy to use, this delay grooves with guitars, runs with synths, installs synchronized vibes and many other things  

Delight Delay joins Boscomac’s already superb line-up of effects that includes Stellar and Echophonic, to name two of my favorites.

Bluewater VST Videos on Reaktor Vectory Ensemble

Brent at Bluewater VST takes us on a guided tour through the Reaktor factory library ensemble Vectory, and shows how to harness the chaos.

It’s a two parter! Here’s the second bit –

Taking Reaktor L3 to the Next L3vel

In this video, Brent Kallmer continues his series on digging into Reaktor factory library instruments, this time with the L3 slicer and sequencer.

Reaktor 5 factory ensembles like L3 have been around since 2005 and are still, I think, under-explored and under-utilized. A sign of how forward-looking these instruments were is that they still look and sound fresh 8 years later and remain ripe for exploitation.

Brent says:

While loop slicing is nothing new, L3 remains a gem on the basis of the results it produces and the elegance and simplicity with which it produces them. Of course, this is not to say that L3 didn’t scare me off for longer than I care to admit.

Let Brent be your guide into the jungle of L3. More here

MASCHINE and REAKTOR: Stack-and-Send FX

This week at BluewaterVST, Brent Kallmer takes us on a tour of Reaktor FX in Maschine. I really love Maschine for its freeform session view style workflow. I think it’s the only sequencer / host that gets this right aside from Ableton.

Enjoy Brent’s tutorial and check out the rest of his site here.

Video Tutorial: Antonio Blanca’s NOD-E

In this video, Brent Kallmer of BluewaterVST takes us through the wonderful NOD-E ensemble by Antonio Blanca, an algorithmic music machine that generates MIDI note data based on the positions of nodes moving on the instrument panel.

Says Brent:

You might think of NOD-E as the sequencer that you get when the nodes in Spiral reach escape velocity and break out of orbit. In NOD-E, 8 nodes travel around an XY-field and trigger notes when they cross certain boundaries (defined by you). Movement along the X-axis triggers notes; movement along the Y-axis determines the triggered note’s velocity (in other words, a note that is triggered at a high Y-value will play more loudly than one that is triggered at a low value. The nodes are propelled throughout the XY field by two polyphonic LFOs (one for each axis).

The cool thing about NOD-E is it can sound like anything – you can route the MIDI data to other plugins, even to hardware synths – or record and edit the sequence in a sequencer. Big ups to Brent for this great video introduction to the ensemble.