Tag Archives: Video

Basic Sequencer for Anything in Reaktor: The Roux, Part 1

This is part of a set of tutorials I did for Peter Kirn’s Kore site back in 2008 – we were creating materials that highlighted Native Instruments products and how they could be used in Kore. Well, the product is defunct and the old site is down, so here is the first in a series on the Roux sequencer macro, showing how it can be used to manipulate the read position in a basic grain delay. Also see here where I’ve built an updated version of the Roux macro that is used in this tutorial.

Update: hey, this is back online now at kore.noisepages.com! Awesome!

rouxscreen

Here is an index to the series:

In French cooking, there’s a sauce base called a roux (pronounced “roo”) that is the foundation of bechamel and other sauces. This is a sequencer macro that is the equivalent for programming sequenced instruments in Reaktor – you can take it in any direction from here. In its most basic form it can send velocity information to trigger percussion, or modulate instrument parameters like cutoff and resonance. With a few simple changes it becomes a pitch sequencer.

I decided to teach how to use the roux step sequencer before diving into the guts of the Frankenloop because understanding this will make that much easier to untangle. Besides, this is a more modular-ready macro, easily popped into anything else you happen to be building or toying with – anything that could use some sauce, really.

I decided to teach how to use the roux step sequencer in a practical way before diving into the guts because understanding this will make that much easier to untangle. Besides, this is a more modular-ready macro, easily popped into anything else you happen to be building or toying with – like the granular delay we’ve been working on. Anything that could use some sauce, really.

In part one, we look at two uses of this versatile basic ingredient. Download the ensemble and follow along with the video tutorial.

Roux Sequencer Macro for Reaktor from Create Digital Media on Vimeo.

Video: The Difference Between Reaktor Instruments And Ensembles

Here’s a tutorial video from NI that was posted about a month ago and has a comically low number of views. 342 views? Ridiculous! This is a great introduction to the differences between instruments, ensembles and Reaktor Player instruments, which they refer to as Komplete instruments.

The Daybreak Guide to REAKTOR’s Lurker

Brent Kallmer is back with one of his great explorations of an under-appreciated Reaktor factory library classic. I was pondering recently how Reaktor 5 was so far ahead of its time that people are only catching up to it now. This is nuts since Reaktor 5 was released in 2005! Brent is doing a fantastic job documenting and exposing wonderful factory ensembles that were, truth be told, sort of unceremoniously dumped on the world with little fanfare or explanation.


Says Brent:

Lurker is one of REAKTOR’s most beguiling effects—and also one of its most inscrutable. It uses a complex and powerful modulation sequencing system to control various parameters on two independent delay units. The versatility of these two delays allows you to transform audio (from either Lurker’s sampler or from an external source) into everything from rhythmically precise textures to trippy comb-filtered psychedelia.

Enjoy the video, and when you want to try Lurker yourself, it’s right there in the Factory tab of your Reaktor browser sidebar.

Bluewater VST Videos on Reaktor Vectory Ensemble

Brent at Bluewater VST takes us on a guided tour through the Reaktor factory library ensemble Vectory, and shows how to harness the chaos.

It’s a two parter! Here’s the second bit –

Taking Reaktor L3 to the Next L3vel

In this video, Brent Kallmer continues his series on digging into Reaktor factory library instruments, this time with the L3 slicer and sequencer.

Reaktor 5 factory ensembles like L3 have been around since 2005 and are still, I think, under-explored and under-utilized. A sign of how forward-looking these instruments were is that they still look and sound fresh 8 years later and remain ripe for exploitation.

Brent says:

While loop slicing is nothing new, L3 remains a gem on the basis of the results it produces and the elegance and simplicity with which it produces them. Of course, this is not to say that L3 didn’t scare me off for longer than I care to admit.

Let Brent be your guide into the jungle of L3. More here